New Life Recovery and Coaching – Purpose and Goals

This WordPress.com site is about ovevrcoming substance abuse/dependence and life coaching. It focuses on the recovery process and regaining control of one's life and moving forward with success.

New Life for 2013 – Resiliency

Resiliency is a trait that is considered a key attribute to emotional health and well-being.  Put simply it is the ability to bounce back after a hardship, the process of adapting well in the face of adversity, trauma, stress, or challenging life events.  Resiliency is also important in addiction recovery.  It may involve a lot of self soul-searching and support, but is very useful to gain some psychological insights into potential underlying causes of an addiction, and overcoming these causes.

The good news is that resilience is a behavioral trait that can be strengthened.  It involves looking at situations realistically and rationally.  Keeping a positive view on oneself and exercising the capacity to experience strong feelings in productive manners are some of the key areas to exercise.  Having a sense of self-empowerment in challenging situations and achieving victory in these situations contribute to resiliency.

Are there examples that you can consider resilience to be a key behavioral attribute in dealing with a challenging life event?  Addiction recovery?

As always visit http://www.newliferc.com for additional information.

Mike

A New Perspective on a New Life – Stages of Behavioral Change

The Stages of Change

To review, the five stages of behavioral change are:

  1. Pre-contemplation
  2. Contemplation
  3. Preparation/Determination
  4. Action/Willpower
  5. Maintenance

2. Contemplation

This stage is typically the second stage of the behavioral stage change model.  During this stage the individual usually is acknowledging that there is a problem but struggling with uncertainty of the change and what it is going to involve.     There is not yet a commitment to change.  It may be interpreted as giving up an enjoyed behavior.  They are weighing pros and cons, and the benefits and barriers to change.  At this stage they can perhaps be  influenced and helped effectively by encouraging them to work at reducing the cons of changing their behavior.

Reaching this stage is typically a hopeful step forward.  Do not be discouraged by the reversal to a previous stage.  This is not unusual and can happen at any of the five stages.

Please visit http://www.newliferc.com or contact me at the information provided on the web site for additional information on these stages.  In addition, I encourage any comments, questions, or concerns left on this blog.

Mike

New Life for 2013 – Understanding Alcohol Use Disorders

New Life for 2013 – Understanding Alcohol Use Disorders.

New Life for 2013 – Understanding Alcohol Use Disorders

As I am discussing the stages of behavioral change, I am going to try to throw in some informative articles.  The one I am posting today briefly explains alcohol use disorders.  I believe that this can also apply to other drug addictions as well.  Take a look.

Understanding Alcohol Use Disorders

Visit http://www.newliferc.com for additional information.

Mike

A New Perspective on a New Life – Stages of Behavioral Change

The Stages of Change

To review, the five stages of behavioral change are:

  1. Pre-contemplation
  2. Contemplation
  3. Preparation/Determination
  4. Action/Willpower
  5. Maintenance

Pre-Contemplation

This stage is typically the first stage of the behavioral stage change model.  During this stage the individual usually is in denial or is not even aware that there exists a behavior that is undesirable.  He/she is not aware that the behavior is damaging or potentially a health risk to themselves, or perhaps others.

This is many times the case in addictions.  The person is not interested in changing their behavior, and may even be blaming others for the usage of drugs or alcohol and the negative outcomes of the substance usage.  There may  not even be any concern of the individual about their usage.  The individual’s perception of the drug or alcohol usage is of pleasure – a type of “everybody does it” attitude.

With this being the first stage of the change model, it is the hope that the individual will progress to stage two – the contemplation stage.  This stage offers more concrete and noticeable behavioral change characteristics.  Try to not be discouraged by the time passage of the transition from the pre-contemplation to contemplation stages.  There are techniques to persuade some to move to the contemplation stage.

Please visit http://www.newliferc.com or contact me at the information provided on the web site for additional information on these techniques.  In addition, I encourage any comments, questions, or concerns left on this blog.

Mike

New Life for 2013 – Habits to Avoid

My intention is to discuss the five behavioral stages for change, but I found this article in another blog of which I participate.  I thought that it was a great down-to-earth article so I am going to post it for today.  I believe that it is a great piece of prevention information along with applicability to any recovery stage.

Click on the below link to open the article.

Habits to Avoid

Visit http://www.newliferc.com for additional information.

Mike

A New Perspective on a New Life – Stages of Behavioral Change

The Stages of Change

According to Prochaska & DiClemente (1983), there are five stages of behavioral change.  They are :

  1. Pre-contemplation
  2. Contemplation
  3. Preparation/Determination
  4. Action/Willpower
  5. Maintenance

These stages of change have been well-received by the psychological field over the past few decades.  They are also useful for recovery from drug or alcohol addiction.  Each stage has characteristics in describing the progression of a behavioral change.  An understanding of each stage is very useful for successful change of an undesired habit or behavior.

I will be introducing these (or reinforcing them if they are already familiar) over the next several blogs.  Please feel free to comment or provide feedback.

As always, visit http://www.newliferc.com for further information.

Mike

It’s 2013!!! Are You Ready for Your New Life?

Happy New Year All,

I hope that your New Year’s Eve went well.  It is a great time to absorb the highlights of 2012, and decide what you want to accomplish in 2013.  In 2 Corinthians 5:17 Paul mentions that “This means that anyone who belongs to Christ has become a new person. The old life is gone; a new life has begun!”  Perhaps 2013 will be the year for that “new life.”

As the new year begins, I will be posting blogs regularly.  I am going to try to post them daily.  The posts will be related to beginning a new life by overcoming life’s challenges, specializing in triumphing over alcohol and drug related concerns.  I welcome all comments and feedback.  By the way, this blog is one of my 2013 objectives.  The expectation is that it will reach at least one (but preferably many)  who can prosper from its content.

Have a Happy New Year and visit http://www.newliferc.com,

Mike

New Life for 2013

It is now New Year’s Eve 2013.  Have you made some commitments to improve your life starting tomorrow?  Breaking old habits and beginning new habits are typically big decisions, especially if one is serious about the change.  These commitments can even be a bit intimidating.  There are some things that can be done to make these accomplishments more achievable.  Here are a few practices that usually help to assure success:

  • Write down your realistic objectives
  • Outline a plan
  • Keep a progress report
  • Keep it simple

Change is not easy, but success at your objectives can be extremely rewarding.  I invite all to visit http://www.newliferc.com for further information.

Have a great and safe New Year’s Eve,

Mike

Great Article about Recovery for the Holidays

Great Article about Recovery for the Holidays

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